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Is Nutritional Therapy Right for You?

saladDo you suffer from a chronic condition? Are you running out of ideas on how to manage this condition? You may want to give Nutritional Therapy a try. This type of therapy can help with a variety of health concerns. A new perspective might give you the opportunity to treat your condition in a different way.

What is Nutritional Therapy?

Nutritional Therapy applies the latest theories and research in nutrition and health sciences to help people manage chronic diseases or promote better health.

What is the goal of Nutritional Therapy?

The main goal of nutritional therapy is to help improve the way your body functions. This includes your digestive, immune, endocrine, and cardiovascular systems. Nutritional therapy can also help with gas and bloating, low energy, insomnia, blood sugar issues, weight loss or gain, joint pain and stiffness, and other food sensitivities and allergies. Many people don’t realize the impact their nutrition can have on their everyday lives. Nutritional therapy can help.

How does a Nutritional Therapist work?

First, your nutritional therapist will gather your health history information from you. This will help them determine the types of problems you’re dealing with and how their expertise can help. You’ll then receive a detailed and personalized list of diet and lifestyle recommendations. Following these guidelines may help relieve some of your symptoms. Your nutritional therapist can also provide guidance on digestion and absorption, managing stress, and even avoiding toxins.

Would you like to see if nutritional therapy can help you with your nutrition and lifestyle? Myrtue Medical Center has you covered. Visit the nutritional therapy page on our website to learn more. Julie Klein, R.D./L.D., our registered, licensed dietitian would love to use her expertise to guide you to living a healthier and happier life. Give us a call today at 712-755-4318 to schedule an appointment, or visit our website to learn more about the services we offer.

 
References
https://instituteofhealthsciences.com/what-is-nutritional-therapy/
https://myrtuemedical.org/our-services/dietary-services/nutritional-therapy/
http://www.prairiehillnutrition.com/nutritional-therapy.html

Winter Preparedness Tips

With the prediction of winter storms this weekend, now is the time to properly prepare for cold weather, potential loss of power, and limited access to services, including roads, medical care, and communication systems. Extreme cold and harsh winter storms can dramatically increase the daily hardships and day-to-day survival challenges for all residents, but especially those who have special health care needs.

It’s important to first understand the terms of declining weather and pending winter storms.

  • A winter weather advisory means that cold, ice, and snow are expected.
  • A winter storm watch means severe weather such as heavy snow or ice is possible in the next day or two.
  • A winter storm warning means that severe winter conditions have begun or will begin very soon.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) provides the following tips for seniors and people with disabilities:

  • Make prior arrangements with your physician or check with your oxygen supplier about emergency plans for those on respirators or other electric-powered medical equipment.
  • Plan now to have electrical backup for medical equipment.
  • Develop a back-up communications plan by having a charged cell phone in case land lines are disrupted.
  • Maintain a two-week supply of medications, both prescription and non-prescription.
  • Have copies of your medical records, prescriptions, and medical needs readily available.
  • Have contact lenses, extra eyeglasses, and batteries for hearing aids ready to go.
  • Include your service animals and pets in your plans.

FEMA also recommends that people with special needs develop and stay in touch with a nearby network of assistance before winter storms or record cold move in. It’s important for neighbors, relatives, care attendants, friends and coworkers to be part of your care and communications circle. Never depend on one person alone.

Severe winter weather including snow, subfreezing temperatures, strong winds, ice, or even heavy rain requires planning ahead. FEMA recommends an emergency supply kit that includes:

  • A battery powered radio, extra flashlights, and batteries, and, at minimum, a week’s supply of canned or non-perishable food and bottled water.
  • Adequate clothing and blankets for warmth.
  • First Aid Supplies.

Remember that planning ahead, assembling an emergency supply kit, staying informed, and keeping those in your circle informed about you are the best ways to stay safe through the uncertain days of winter. For additional information on winter storm safety, please contact Myrtue Medical Center’s Public Health Office at 712.755.4422.

Please Don’t Kiss the Baby!

Charlie

What can seem like a simple cold or a fever blister for an adult, can be fatal for a baby. RSV (Respiratory Syncytial Virus) is extremely contagious and adults are contagious before they show any symptoms. Anyone coming in contact with a newborn for their first few months should wash their hands before touching a new baby and avoid any face kissing. Kissing is one of the most direct ways we unintentionally share our germs. A baby’s immune system is pretty much non-existent when they are born so what is a mere irritant for an adult, can turn into a full blown fight for their life in a newborn.

 

It is important that babies know they are loved. But it is even more important that they be kept safe from infections their bodies are not ready to fight.

Love your babies by keeping them safe and healthy!

It’s Not Too Late to Get Your Flu Shot!

man with fluTo flu or not to flu…that is the question! While many people still question whether or not to get a flu shot each year, it is still one of the safest and most effective ways to prevent the flu. It is not yet possible to completely eliminate the risk of getting the flu, but getting vaccinated does help greatly reduce this risk for you and your family.

Each year the flu vaccine is engineered to help your body develop antibodies to several strains of the flu virus. These antibodies help protect your body against infections. The flu virus can spread very easily. In fact, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), you can catch the flu from anyone within six-feet of you who may be infected. AND the flu can be spread anywhere from one day before a person starts seeing symptoms up to seven days after a person becomes sick! There is no way to know if the people around you are carrying the flu virus which may infect you and your loved ones.

While some cases of the flu might be mild others can be severe with symptoms ranging from a low-grade fever to life-threatening pneumonia. Those who are most at risk for complications of influenza include:

  • Pregnant women
  • Babies under six-months old
  • Young children
  • People with chronic health conditions such as asthma, diabetes or heart problems

Getting the flu shot, not only protects you and your family, it can also protect the most vulnerable people in our community.

Washing your hands is the second most effective way to protect yourself against the flu. Make handwashing a priority this flu season. Here is a video you can use to teach your children to wash their hands correctly.

Join Myrtue Medical Center in fighting the flu this season! Give us a call (833-662-2273) to find out how you can get your flu vaccine and protect you and your loved ones this flu season.

Myrtue Medical Center to Honor Medical-Surgical Nurses During ‘Medical-Surgical Nurses Week’

MSNW-Sign-We-are-Celebrating-MSNWThe nurses are being celebrated for their dedication, skills, and heroism.

Medical-surgical nurses focus every day on caring compassionately for patients and families. The Academy of Medical-Surgical Nurses (AMSN) has designated a special week to shift that focus to the nurses themselves. Myrtue Medical Center will participate in a national celebration of medical-surgical nurses during Medical-Surgical Nurses Week, November 1-7, 2018.

“We have a talented, caring, simply amazing group of nurses at Myrtue Medical Center. Our nurses work diligently every day to provide the best experience for patients when they are in the hospital. I am so honored to work with such a phenomenal group of nurses who provide compassionate care each and every day” said Christie Matthies RN, BSN, MBA, Medical Surgical Manager. “Medical-Surgical Nurses Week is an ideal time to recognize the work of these dedicated nurses.”

Medical-surgical nurses possess specialized skills and knowledge of the entire spectrum of nursing care. They make a difference by building the profession of nursing and the medical-surgical nursing specialty, mentoring and nurturing each other, advocating for patients and families, serving their communities through care and education, and improving patient care.

The special week is also meant to raise awareness of the medical-surgical nursing specialty among other nurses. One of the most diverse nursing specialties practiced today, medical-surgical nurses care for adult patients in a broad range of settings, applying their expert knowledge to all body systems and disease processes.

Myrtue Welcomes Jennifer Bruck, ARNP

Jennifer BruckMyrtue Medical Center is excited to introduce you to the newest Advanced Practice Professional to join Myrtue’s team of family practitioners, Jennifer Bruck, ARNP, FNP-BC.

Starting Nov. 12th, Jennifer will begin seeing patients Monday through Friday in Myrtue’s Earling Clinic, and she will provide coverage on Tuesday evenings from 4-8 p.m. at the clinic in Harlan. Most recently, Jennifer saw patients of all ages at CHI in Missouri Valley and previously worked as a Registered Nurse at Children’s Hospital & Medical Center in Omaha in both newborn intensive care and intensive care units. Dr. David Erlbacher, MD, remains the supervising physician in Earling, and he will continue to see patients at the Earling Clinic on Tuesdays.

Schedule an Appointment to See Jennifer In Earling, Starting Nov. 12th:

Monday, 8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Tuesday, 12 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Wednesday, 8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Thursday, 8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Friday, 8:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Thank you again for allowing us to continue serving you, and please welcome Jennifer. To schedule an appointment call 833-662-2273.

Time for Flu Vaccine!

Fight the FluProtect yourself, your family and your community this season with an annual flu vaccine for everyone in your family who is 6 months and older. This fall, Myrtue Medical Center’s Department of Public Health is offering a variety of flu clinics throughout Shelby County. Our goal is to protect all residents from complications related to influenza by increasing influenza immunization rates in Shelby County.  In addition to the variety of flu clinics offered in Shelby County, Myrtue is hosting Ayzlee’s Flu Clinics in Harlan, Elk Horn and Irwin. Ayzlee McCarthy, of Elk Horn, IA was diagnosed with influenza A and B on December 27, 2014 and passed away at the age of 3 on December 29, 2014 from septic shock, secondary to influenza. The “Ayzlee’s Flu Clinics” honor Ayzlee McCarthy and promote the importance of the flu vaccine.

  • The Harlan Ayzlee’s clinic will be held on Friday, October 12th from 4-7:00 PM at the Community Health Building at 2712 12th Street.
  • The Elk Horn Ayzlee’s clinic will be held Monday, October 8th from 5:00-7:00 PM at the Elk Horn School, 4114 Madison Street.
  • The Irwin Ayzlee’s clinic will be held on Tuesday, October 23rd and Thursday, October 25th from 4:00-8:00 PM at the Irwin Elementary School, 100 Eva Street.

Influenza remains a top ten leading cause of death in Iowa, yet can be prevented by receiving a yearly flu vaccine.  Some people are at higher risk for complications of influenza which makes receiving the vaccine very important. People at higher risk include:

  • Pregnant women
  • Children, particularly those younger than 2 years of age
  • Adults age 65 and older
  • People who have certain medical conditions like asthma, high blood pressure, cancer, diabetes and lung diseases.

Individuals with these risk factors are protected when they receive the flu vaccine and also when those around them are immunized. Additionally, infants under six months of age are not old enough to receive the flu vaccine. The best way to protect young infants is to vaccinate family members and caregivers in order to provide a “cocoon of protection”.

While the timing of flu season is unpredictable, seasonal flu activity usually occurs in late fall and winter, but can last as late as May.  It takes about two weeks after vaccination for antibodies to develop in the body that protect against influenza virus infection, making fall a great time to get the flu vaccine.

You have the power to protect your family against flu this season. Get yourself and your family a flu vaccine. Fight the Flu!  More information about available flu vaccines for the 2018-2019 season can be found at: https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/index.html .

To schedule your appointment for the flu vaccine or for questions, call Shelby County Public Health at 712-755-4422 or go online at www.shelbycountyclinics.com.  

 

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