Is Nutritional Therapy Right for You?

saladDo you suffer from a chronic condition? Are you running out of ideas on how to manage this condition? You may want to give Nutritional Therapy a try. This type of therapy can help with a variety of health concerns. A new perspective might give you the opportunity to treat your condition in a different way.

What is Nutritional Therapy?

Nutritional Therapy applies the latest theories and research in nutrition and health sciences to help people manage chronic diseases or promote better health.

What is the goal of Nutritional Therapy?

The main goal of nutritional therapy is to help improve the way your body functions. This includes your digestive, immune, endocrine, and cardiovascular systems. Nutritional therapy can also help with gas and bloating, low energy, insomnia, blood sugar issues, weight loss or gain, joint pain and stiffness, and other food sensitivities and allergies. Many people don’t realize the impact their nutrition can have on their everyday lives. Nutritional therapy can help.

How does a Nutritional Therapist work?

First, your nutritional therapist will gather your health history information from you. This will help them determine the types of problems you’re dealing with and how their expertise can help. You’ll then receive a detailed and personalized list of diet and lifestyle recommendations. Following these guidelines may help relieve some of your symptoms. Your nutritional therapist can also provide guidance on digestion and absorption, managing stress, and even avoiding toxins.

Would you like to see if nutritional therapy can help you with your nutrition and lifestyle? Myrtue Medical Center has you covered. Visit the nutritional therapy page on our website to learn more. Julie Klein, R.D./L.D., our registered, licensed dietitian would love to use her expertise to guide you to living a healthier and happier life. Give us a call today at 712-755-4318 to schedule an appointment, or visit our website to learn more about the services we offer.

 
References
https://instituteofhealthsciences.com/what-is-nutritional-therapy/
https://myrtuemedical.org/our-services/dietary-services/nutritional-therapy/
http://www.prairiehillnutrition.com/nutritional-therapy.html

Winter Preparedness Tips

With the prediction of winter storms this weekend, now is the time to properly prepare for cold weather, potential loss of power, and limited access to services, including roads, medical care, and communication systems. Extreme cold and harsh winter storms can dramatically increase the daily hardships and day-to-day survival challenges for all residents, but especially those who have special health care needs.

It’s important to first understand the terms of declining weather and pending winter storms.

  • A winter weather advisory means that cold, ice, and snow are expected.
  • A winter storm watch means severe weather such as heavy snow or ice is possible in the next day or two.
  • A winter storm warning means that severe winter conditions have begun or will begin very soon.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) provides the following tips for seniors and people with disabilities:

  • Make prior arrangements with your physician or check with your oxygen supplier about emergency plans for those on respirators or other electric-powered medical equipment.
  • Plan now to have electrical backup for medical equipment.
  • Develop a back-up communications plan by having a charged cell phone in case land lines are disrupted.
  • Maintain a two-week supply of medications, both prescription and non-prescription.
  • Have copies of your medical records, prescriptions, and medical needs readily available.
  • Have contact lenses, extra eyeglasses, and batteries for hearing aids ready to go.
  • Include your service animals and pets in your plans.

FEMA also recommends that people with special needs develop and stay in touch with a nearby network of assistance before winter storms or record cold move in. It’s important for neighbors, relatives, care attendants, friends and coworkers to be part of your care and communications circle. Never depend on one person alone.

Severe winter weather including snow, subfreezing temperatures, strong winds, ice, or even heavy rain requires planning ahead. FEMA recommends an emergency supply kit that includes:

  • A battery powered radio, extra flashlights, and batteries, and, at minimum, a week’s supply of canned or non-perishable food and bottled water.
  • Adequate clothing and blankets for warmth.
  • First Aid Supplies.

Remember that planning ahead, assembling an emergency supply kit, staying informed, and keeping those in your circle informed about you are the best ways to stay safe through the uncertain days of winter. For additional information on winter storm safety, please contact Myrtue Medical Center’s Public Health Office at 712.755.4422.

Ultrasound Technologist

Diagnostic Imaging Department

On-call position.  Schedule varies.  Works various days Monday through Friday 8:00 am to 4:30 pm.  Performs ultrasound procedures, clerical duties, and shares in departmental work.  Produces consistent quality ultrasound examinations by selecting proper technical factors and using proper examination protocol.  Exhibits proper positioning techniques.  Performs special procedures (US guided needle biopsies with sterile technique).  Demonstrates knowledge in maintenance of equipment, transducer, and disinfection equipment.  Demonstrates accuracy, thoroughness, and neatness in paperwork/computer preparation for patient procedures.  Experience is not required but some work experience is preferred.  Must be a high school graduate with required training in ultrasound.  Must be registered with the ARDMS or RDMS and RVT.  Must be able to perform vascular ultrasound exams and prefer to be able to perform general ultrasound exams also.