Myrtue Medical Center Named a 2018 Top 100 Critical Access Hospital

 

Top 100 CAH - 7 Time Recipient - 2018Myrtue Medical Center was recently named one of the Top 100 Critical Access Hospitals in the United States by The Chartis Center for Rural Health.

“This achievement is very gratifying and validates our daily commitment to providing the best healthcare possible to our community, while maintaining an efficient and effective facility. I am especially proud of being a seven-year recipient of this award. ” said Barry Jacobsen, CEO Myrtue Medical Center.  “Very few hospitals, big or small, can make that statement. I also know we have received this recognition repeatedly because we have a tremendous staff comprised of dedicated, competent, and caring individuals.”

Myrtue Medical Center scored in the top 100 of Critical Access Hospitals on the iVantage Health Analytics’ Hospital Strength INDEX®. The INDEX is the industry’s most comprehensive and objective assessment of rural provider performance and its results are the basis for many of rural healthcare’s most prominent awards, advocacy efforts and legislative initiatives. The list of the Top 100 Critical Access Hospitals can be found on the Chartis Group website.

The Top 100 Critical Access Hospitals play a key role in providing a safety net to communities across America – and the INDEX measures these facilities across eight pillars of hospital strength: Inpatient Share Ranking, Outpatient Share Ranking, Cost, Charge, Quality, Outcomes, Patient Perspective, and Financial Stability.

“I am incredibly proud of Myrtue and all my co-workers for this honor, but it does not surprise me,” said Dr. Hannah Johnk. “I see excellence on a daily basis from every department, with patients always at the center of our efforts. You can see the care each person puts into their work in order to make this such a great place.”

Keep Your Heart Healthy

Heart HealthDid you know heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women in the US? It is also one of the major causes of disability. According to the American Heart Association, 2,300 Americans die of cardiovascular disease each day. That’s an average of 1 death every 38 seconds! These numbers may seem overwhelming, but heart disease is preventable.

The term heart disease covers all heart-related conditions including diseased vessels, structural problems, and blood clots. Some of the most common types of heart disease are high blood pressure, cardiac arrest, arrhythmia, stroke, congenital heart disease, and congestive heart failure.

The first step to prevention and management is to know your risks. Have your heart checked by your doctor on a yearly basis and regularly monitor your blood pressure, blood sugar, cholesterol and weight. Knowing your current health status will help you determine a strategy for prevention and maintenance.

Making healthy lifestyle changes is a key to lowering your risk of developing heart disease. Even if you have already been diagnosed with heart disease, healthy choices can make a big difference. Here are some ways to lower your risk:

  • Watch your weight and eat healthy
  • Quit smoking and avoid secondhand smoke
  • Control your cholesterol and blood pressure
  • Get adequate sleep
  • Limit alcohol use
  • Be more active
  • Manage your stress levels

Click here for more tips and advice from the American Heart Association.

How’s your heart health? Need a checkup? Don’t know your numbers? Call Myrtue Medical Center at 833-662-2273 to schedule an appointment today!

For information about all our medical and health services, visit our website.

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Make Your New Year’s Resolutions Stick

January-New Years ResolutionsAre you going to beat the odds?

Nearly six weeks ago, almost half of us made New Year’s resolutions. Many of those resolutions were commitments to our health and well-being such as eating healthier, getting more exercise and taking better care of ourselves in general. However, statistics show that nearly 80% percent of those vows will already be abandoned by the second week of February. It is easy to make light of New Year’s resolutions and our inability to keep them but when it comes to our health and wellness we may want to strengthen our commitment to really make it stick this time. There’s no time like the present, right!? So, how can we help ourselves beat those odds? Here are a few tips.

Create a Plan

How are you going to achieve this goal? Define why you created the goal in the first place. Most of us would agree that it would be great to lose 10 pounds, but that is the objective, not the reason for the goal. Think about the real reason behind your goal.  Write out your goal and visualize your strategy for achieving it. Set frequent benchmarks throughout the year and check in with yourself on a regular basis to make sure you are staying on target.

Set a Few, Realistic Goals

Having too many goals can be overwhelming and discouraging. If you have a lot of goals you’d like to reach, prioritize the top two. Work on them, and when you’ve accomplished them, stop – celebrate, and then move on to the next two. You may find that accomplishing these initial goals will give you extra motivation and make it easier to accomplish more goals in the future.

Even one goal can be quite the undertaking when you consider the number of behavior changes that are required. Make sure your goals are reasonable and achievable. Goals should be challenging but not impossible! If you have a big goal, such as losing 100 pounds, set smaller intermediate goals and remember to celebrate each time you achieve an intermediate goal before moving on to the next one.

Use the Buddy System

Having a friend or colleague help you with your resolution could be the extra inspiration or encouragement that is essential to your success. Voicing the goal to someone works to cement the goal in your mind and create accountability.

Even if you didn’t make an official New Year’s resolution, you might still be looking for some new ideas to rejuvenate your health and wellness. Many of these are fun and quite manageable:

Try drinking more water, getting at least seven hours of sleep, or scheduling your annual primary care visit.

Here’s to making positive health and wellness changes and to beating the odds!

For information about Myrtue Medical Center and all of our medical and health services, visit our website or call (712) 755-5161.

Registered Nurse

Medical/Surgical Department

On-call position.  Works various shifts as needed.  Utilizes the nursing process to provide and direct quality patient care in various settings:  Med-Surg, Swing Bed, OB, SCU, ER, Outpatient, and Perioperative.  Directs and provides patient/family teaching. Provides leadership when working with health team members in maintaining standards for professional nursing practice in the clinical setting.  Must be a graduate from an approved Professional Nursing program.  Must be a Registered Nurse currently licensed in the State of Iowa.  Certification in Basic Life Support is required within 3 months of date of hire.  Advanced Cardiac Life Support certification is required within 12 months of date of hire.

Registered Nurse

Medical/Surgical Department

Full-time position (36 hours per week).  Works 7:00 pm to 7:00 am.  Works every third weekend.  Utilizes the nursing process to provide and direct quality patient care in various settings:  Med/Surg, Swing Bed, OB, SCU, ER, Outpatient, and Perioperative.  Directs and provides patient/family teaching.  Provides leadership when working with health team members in maintaining standards for professional nursing practice in the clinical setting.  Completes admission assessments and documentation.  Initiates and individualizes care plans on admission.  Keeps practitioner/charge nurse informed of change in patient condition.  Must be a graduate from an approved professional nursing program.  Must be a Registered Nurse currently licensed in the State of Iowa. Certification in Basic Life Support is required within 3 months of date of hire.  Advanced Cardiac Life Support certification is required within 12 months of date of hire.